Hello – I’m Stephen Greer, a theatre academic and cultural critic based in Glasgow, Scotland.

I teach and write about theatre and performance as well as videogames, TV and visual culture, focusing on the politics of sexuality and gender but with topics as varied as the work of National Theatre Wales, the BBC’s Sherlock and glamrock wrestler Adrian Street.

I’m the author of Contemporary British Queer Performance (Palgrave 2012) and currently completing a new book on solo performance in neoliberal times.

Publications Events and Conferences

Research Highlights

What Money Can’t Buy: The Economies of Adrian Howells

An essay in Dee Heddon and Dominic Johnson’s edited collection on the life and work of Adrian Howells. Drawing on contracts, receipts and other private records drawn from Howells’ personal archive, I explore the labour involved in the creation of one-to-one performances and their potential resistance of neoliberal economies of exchange.

A chapter in It’s All Allowed: The Performances of Adrian Howells (2016), published by Intellect Ltd. and the Live Art Development Agency.

‘It is not just a celebration of an extraordinary body of work but also a handbook for those working in the tricky, ethically fraught area of intimate performance.’ 
– Lyn Gardner, The Guardian

Contemporary British Queer Performance (2012)

Tracing a genealogy of politics and practice from early lesbian and gay theatre in the 1970s to the 1990s and beyond, this book explores how foundational debates concerning visibility, authenticity and representation have been transformed by the advent of queer theory and queer activism.

‘Stephen Greer’s study Contemporary British Queer Performance contributes not only to queer theories and performance studies but also to history and sociology, literary and theatre studies. It is exemplary in its interdisciplinary approach and delivers rich and valuable findings in a wide spectrum of performances.’ – Theaterforschung

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Playing queer: Affordances for sexuality in Fable and Dragon Age

A journal paper exploring the possibilities for playing ‘queer’ in two mass-market video games. While gamers are often invited to make decisions about their avatars gender, race and appearance at the beginning of play, they are rarely – if ever – asked to make a decision about their sexuality. This paper explores how sexuality is produced through gaming and design choices which most often function by reflecting the player’s desires back towards them.

Published in the Journal of Gaming and Virtual Worlds.

PhD supervision

I welcome proposals from prospective PhD or MPhil students who are interested in studying at the University of Glasgow. I am particularly able to support projects concerned with:

– contemporary British theatre and performance

– queer studies / queer culture

– sexuality, gender and feminism

– new media and digital performance / theatre, performance and gaming

– social and applied theatre / activism

I’m very happy to talk through draft proposals, and discuss possibilities for funding – for initial conversations, please contact me at stephen.greer@glasgow.ac.uk.

Teaching

I am currently Lecturer in Theatre Practices at the University of Glasgow.

Focusing on contemporary and c20th practice, my teaching combines traditional university formats – lectures and seminars – with practice-based workshops. This approach is grounded in the belief that theory, history and practice can inform each other, and that performance can be used to ask and answer questions in the same moment. My areas of expertise include queer / LGBT performance, documentary and verbatim theatres and new media performance, as well as devising and improvisation.

Since 2013, I have lead the first year Theatre Studies programme at the University of Glasgow where I contribute to Honours and postgraduate teaching across the School of Culture and Creative Arts. My current specialist Honours options include Queer Exceptions – a course about performance, queer theory and ideas of the ‘singular subject’ – and The Activist Stage, an applied and social theatre course which examines the relationships between performance and activism.